Free baby and child first aid app from the British Red Cross

British Red Cross first aid app

Being a parent is tough. The sleepless nights, the multitude of illnesses the children bring home and above all the worry about something happening to your precious little ones. But the worst possible scenario is that heart-stopping moment when your little one has an accident or illness and you don’t know what to do.

I’ve lost count of the number of mealtimes when one of my children has inhaled a bit of food. The couple of seconds where they looked at me in a panic before managing to cough it up again seemed to go in slow motion. My worst nightmare would be if the piece of food didn’t dislodge and they choked. Would you know what to do in this scenario?

We all have our own worries about our children, but how many of us would actually be able to administer first aid should the unthinkable happen?

According to the British Red Cross, 70% of children will end up in A & E at some point. That’s why they’ve taken the initiative to support parents so that if their children have an accident, they will both know what to do and be empowered to have the confidence to take action.

It would be difficult to argue against the fact that we all need to know first aid. I personally would hate to come across a situation in the street where someone was injured and be unable to help them. But as a parent, the need is even more pressing. I can’t imagine not being able to help my own child if they were hurt.

A lot of us take a first aid course through work or a voluntary role. However, these are usually based in adult first aid. When it comes to administering first aid to a child or a baby, this can be completely different. Take CPR for example. On an adult, you really have to press quite hard and use both hands in a locked arm position. Of course, for a baby or a child this would be much too heavy-handed and a different technique should be used.

The British Red Cross have noticed that most people who take a paediatric first aid course are likely to be in their third trimester of pregnancy or have a child aged up to eight years old. To encourage people outside of these categories to learn first aid for babies and children, they have created some simple, easy to use learning methods.

Their short, memorable videos will stick in your mind and take under a minute to watch. Alternatively, you can learn online or go on a course that they provide.

They have also created a brand new app that is free to download and has videos, animations, tips and advice. You can learn each element of first aid for babies and children in a matter of minutes. You can even record your child’s allergies and medication requirements in the app.

The app is really easy to use. You can quickly select the injury or illness you want to look at. If your child burns themselves, you need to know immediately what to do. So you can quickly go to the relevant section and follow the step by step instructions.

Screen shot of First Aid App from British Red Cross

The first thing to do is to immediately run the burnt area under cold, running water for at least ten minutes. What I didn’t know is that if you then put clean cling film or a plastic bag on the area, this can help to reduce both the risk of infection and the pain it’s causing.

As well as the simple instructions, there is a video at the top of the screen that you can watch to talk you through the treatment you need to administer. Sometimes it’s reassuring in such a horrible situation just to hear someone telling you that you’re doing the right thing.

British Red Cross have also come up with a quirky and memorable video to help raise awareness, it features some rather cute little rap stars and is definitely worth a watch.

If your child does have an accident or illness, the app is at your fingertips. With just a few clicks, you can find out what to do in an emergency situation. Unless you’re already a first aid expert, please do take the time to get your free baby and child first aid app now.

It really could save lives.

*This post was sponsored by British Red Cross

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